Overview

This firm has experience acting as litigation attorneys for individuals, entrepreneurs, and businesses in federal, and state courts, and arbitrations in a cost-effective and responsive manner. In the past, we have acted as the litigation lawyer for both plaintiffs, and defendants in many areas including:

  • Automobile accidents including left turn cases, and pedestrian accidents
  • Breach of contract
  • Commercial transactions including prejudgment remedies for the sales of goods including judgment enforcement under the California Enforcement of Judgments Act
  • Consumer class actions involving the misrepresentation of goods
  • Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) claims including sexual harassment
  • Fraud & misrepresentation
  • Intentional torts such as assault and battery
  • Professional negligence involving real estate brokers
  • Real estate leases (commercial and residential)
  • Sales of corporate securities
  • Trademark litigation including trademark infringement, inter partes petitions for trademark cancellation
  • Trust disputes including those involving accounting, and undue influence
  • Wage and hour claims (including class actions) involving:
    • Meal Periods
    • Rest Periods
    • Misclassification
    • Unpaid commissions
    • Unpaid overtime wages
    • Inaccurate wage statements

For our services, we offer creative pricing options tailored to the nature of the litigation including:

  • Contingency
  • Fixed
  • Hourly
  • Hybrid

Local Counsel in Southern California

As a Los Angeles lawyer, we accept referrals from out of state, or foreign counsel, and have experience handling a broad array of litigation involving claims for breach of contract, collections, fraud, probate and trust, unfair competition, and wage disputes for both plaintiffs, and defendants in Southern California courts including the Los Angeles County Superior Court, Orange County Superior Court, and the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. To practice before California courts, or the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, an attorney not admitted to either of those bars, must associate local counsel in which capacity we can serve as Los Angeles attorneys.

For out of state attorneys who seek to practice pro hac vice before courts in the Central District of California (Local Rule 83-2.3.3 reproduced below), Los Angeles County Superior Court (Cal. Rules of Court, rule 9.40, reproduced below), Orange County Superior Court or neighboring areas, we can act as local counsel.

U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, L.R. 83-2.3 Pro hac vice or Other Limited Appearance

L.R. 83-2.3.1 Permission to Appear Pro hac vice. Any person who is not otherwise eligible for admission to practice before this Court, but who is a member in good standing of, and eligible to practice before, the bar of any United States Court, or of the highest court of any State, Territory or Insular Possession of the United States, who is of good moral character, and who has been retained to appear before this Court, may, upon written application and proof of payment of the fee as required by the Court, and in the discretion of the Court, be permitted to appear and participate pro hac vice in a particular case. The application shall be accompanied by a certificate from the state bar for each of the states in which the applicant is a member of that particular bar, which has been issued within thirty (30) days prior to the filing of the application and states that the applicant is a member in good standing of the bar of that state court.

L.R. 83-2.3.2 Disqualification from Pro hac vice Appearance. Unless authorized by the Constitution of the United States or Acts of Congress, an applicant is not eligible for permission to practice pro hac vice if the applicant:

(a) Resides in California; or

(b) Is regularly employed in California; or

(c) Is regularly engaged in business, professional, or other similar activities in California.

L.R. 83-2.3.3 Designation of Local Counsel. The person seeking to appear pro hac vice is required to designate an attorney who is a member of the Bar of this Court and who maintains an office within this District as local counsel with whom the Court and opposing counsel may readily communicate regarding the conduct of the case and upon whom papers may be served, unless otherwise ordered by the Court.

L.R. 83-2.3.4 Designation of Co-Counsel. A judge to whom a case is assigned may, in the exercise of discretion, require the designation of an attorney who is a member of the Bar of this Court and who maintains an office within the District as co-counsel with authority to act as attorney of record for all purposes.

L.R. 83-2.3.5 Registered Legal Services Attorney. Any registered legal services attorney authorized to appear in the state courts of California pursuant to California Rule of Court 9.45 may practice before this Court under the conditions set forth in that rule. In addition, the attorney supervising the registered legal services attorney must be a member in good standing of the bar of this Court, and must appear as one of the attorneys of record. By practicing in this Court, the registered legal services attorney submits to the disciplinary authority of the Central District of California concerning attorneys admitted to practice in this Court.

California Rules of Court, Rule 9.40. Counsel pro hac vice

(a) Eligibility

A person who is not a member of the State Bar of California but who is a member in good standing of and eligible to practice before the bar of any United States court or the highest court in any state, territory, or insular possession of the United States, and who has been retained to appear in a particular cause pending in a court of this state, may in the discretion of such court be permitted upon written application to appear as counsel pro hac vice, provided that an active member of the State Bar of California is associated as attorney of record. No person is eligible to appear as counsel pro hac vice under this rule if the person is:

(1) A resident of the State of California;

(2) Regularly employed in the State of California; or

(3) Regularly engaged in substantial business, professional, or other activities in the State of California

(b) Repeated appearances as a cause for denial

Absent special circumstances, repeated appearances by any person under this rule is a cause for denial of an application.

(c) Application

(1) Application in superior court

A person desiring to appear as counsel pro hac vice in a superior court must file with the court a verified application together with proof of service by mail in accordance with Code of Civil Procedure section 1013a of a copy of the application and of the notice of hearing of the application on all parties who have appeared in the cause and on the State Bar of California at its San Francisco office. The notice of hearing must be given at the time prescribed in Code of Civil Procedure section 1005 unless the court has prescribed a shorter period.

(2) Application in Supreme Court or Court of Appeal

An application to appear as counsel pro hac vice in the Supreme Court or a Court of Appeal must be made as provided in rule 8.54, with proof of service on all parties who have appeared in the cause and on the State Bar of California at its San Francisco office.

(d) Contents of application

The application must state:

(1) The applicant’s residence and office address;

(2) The courts to which the applicant has been admitted to practice and the dates of admission;

(3) That the applicant is a member in good standing in those courts;

(4) That the applicant is not currently suspended or disbarred in any court;

(5) The title of court and cause in which the applicant has filed an application to appear as counsel pro hac vice in this state in the preceding two years, the date of each application, and whether or not it was granted; and

(6) The name, address, and telephone number of the active member of the State Bar of California who is attorney of record.

(e) Fee for application

An applicant for permission to appear as counsel pro hac vice under this rule must pay a reasonable fee not exceeding $50 to the State Bar of California with the copy of the application and the notice of hearing that is served on the State Bar. The Board of Governors of the State Bar of California will fix the amount of the fee:

(1) To defray the expenses of administering the provisions of this rule that are applicable to the State Bar and the incidental consequences resulting from such provisions; and

(2) Partially to defray the expenses of administering the Board’s other responsibilities to enforce the provisions of the State Bar Act relating to the competent delivery of legal services and the incidental consequences resulting therefrom.

(f) Counsel pro hac vice subject to jurisdiction of courts and State Bar

A person permitted to appear as counsel pro hac vice under this rule is subject to the jurisdiction of the courts of this state with respect to the law of this state governing the conduct of attorneys to the same extent as a member of the State Bar of California. The counsel pro hac vice must familiarize himself or herself and comply with the standards of professional conduct required of members of the State Bar of California and will be subject to the disciplinary jurisdiction of the State Bar with respect to any of his or her acts occurring in the course of such appearance. Article 5, chapter 4, division III of the Business and Professions Code and the Rules of Procedure of the State Bar govern in any investigation or proceeding conducted by the State Bar under this rule.

(g) Supreme Court and Court of Appeal not precluded from permitting argument in a particular case

This rule does not preclude the Supreme Court or a Court of Appeal from permitting argument in a particular case from a person who is not a member of the State Bar, but who is licensed to practice in another jurisdiction and who possesses special expertise in the particular field affected by the proceeding.